World’s Largest Turtle found in the Amazon River – 800+ lbs

The World’s largest tortoise was recently found in the Amazon River. At an age of roughly 529 years old, 30 feet long, and as wide as an 18 wheeler it is a truly amazing find. Tipping the scales at well over 2,387 pounds OR 1082.72 kg is just out of this world! Hey.. is it? Out of this world?

Truth is, the red rimmed tortoise is also called “red-foot” or “red-legged tortoise”, “Brazilian Giant Turtle”, or sometimes referred to as “South American Forest Turtle”, as well as local names from the natives like: Morrocoy, Woyamou or Wayamo, or variations of Jabuta. These types of large size tortoises are always found in the Amazon River, most of them are found in (Peru, Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela, and so on) the Adults often reach 3m in length which is impressive by itself, however this one is much larger. Generally the females have wide flattened shells, are larger and more numerous than the males tortoise, the Adult tortoise will usually feed entirely on plant food. Not this time.

After small animals and livestock went missing the locals to the region were referring to this turtle as Korrozan or the Eater of Livestock and Korrozan it was! Reportedly, but unconfirmed as of this update, over 20 farmers surrounding a 1 mile stretch of the Amazon River have reported substantial livestock losses increasing rapidly the past few weeks. It’s fair to assume Korrozan was preparing for winter when food resources are not as vast in a river already depleted of the vital underwater plant life they typically thrive on, and the surrounding land is more and more developed each season.

Sadly, Korrozan is dead. Eventually the locals were able to snag her long enough to him down and quickly dispatched him with a single shot to the head. Now that they have Korrozan’s remains at a local animal sanctuary storage warehouse, a team is taking scientific measurements and data so we can learn more about this fascinating creature.

They are unsure why the carapace is so rounded compared the the females more typical flat tops but blood and DNA testing will help uncover some of the mystery in the weeks to come. Researchers believe that she was recently gravid (egg layer) and there may be a nest of eggs somewhere in that region of the Amazon.

Have they hatched? Will there be more? Who knows. I’m far enough away to hope so!